Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Origins


The history of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu goes back very deep and is very complex to explain. If we were to sit here and write out all the details about the history of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and where it came from I could literally write a book. However, in this article I will go briefly into the history of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. For those that are not familiar with Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu), it is a martial art and combat sport that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting with the goal of obtaining a dominant position and in the end submitting your opponent. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu promotes the simple principle that a smaller or weaker person using leverage and proper technique can be successful in defeating a bigger and stronger man.

The martial art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu began with Mitsuyo Maeda who was an expert in Judoka or Judo. During his martial art career, on November 14, 1914 he decided to take a trip to Brazil. During his time there he mixed his style with Jiu Jitsu and until he passed away in 1941. Helio Gracie was influenced by his style while he was a fierce competitor in judo himself. He then later introduced these new techniques to his Gracie and Machado family where together they came out with the new Martial Art of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. In Brazil, the Gracie family challenged anyone from any martial art on a no holds barred fight and would defeat anyone. But it was not until the 1990’s where Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gained is popularity. It was all when Brazilian Jiu Jitsu expert Royce Gracie decided to step into a cage to fight in MMA at the Ultimate Fighting Championships. Back then these were single elimination tournaments where you had a few fights in a row to win the title. It was here that Royce Gracie fought against much larger opponents who were using other martial art styles. He still managed to defeat and submit all his opponents in less than a few minutes bringing him to the title shot at the first UFC event. Royce Gracie pulled off the most shocking victory ever to show the world that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is the # 1 martial art in the world. He did it for the honor of his family and to show the world what Brazilian Jiu Jitsu can do. After this win is where Royce became undefeated and the popularity of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu grew.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Origins

Source by Shawn M. Nassiri

The Benefits of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu for Kids


Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or BJJ is a martial art, a combat sport and a self-defense system. The main focus is on a technique called grappling and ground fighting. Its guiding principle gives an idea that even a much weaker person can defend themselves, by using proper maneuvers in case of an assault.

This system was developed in Brazil in the 1920s when a Judo master Mitsuyo Maeda taught Carlos Gracie, the son of an influential businessman, this technique. The Gracie family spread their skill in the United States after establishing an academy in California. The sport gained international popularity after several martial arts tournaments held in the 1990s; when Royce Gracie fought and won four times against physically larger rivals. These Ultimate Fighting Championships proved that even a much smaller opponent could protect themselves when needed and many thought this would be of great benefit for young people.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu can be developed for self-defense, sport grappling tours and mixed martial arts. Sparring with the opponent plays an important role in training. The rules are very complex and different tournaments may vary in rules, but the main idea is to earn points by advancing or improving your position. The fight is won instantly if the opponent gives up by tapping in cases of choking or joint lock pressure. This sport is sometimes referred to as a form of ‘human chess’ due to its complexity and the philosophy of ‘Brain over Brawn’.

BJJ is suitable for both sexes and all ages, from small children to senior citizens. The principle of applying techniques instead of raw power turns the opponent’s attack energy to your own benefit. The person learns to control a dangerous situation without hurting someone or getting hurt.

The aforementioned facts contribute to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu being a great sport for kids. It involves no kicks. However, it does provide youth with discipline as the training can be tough and the sport requires dedication, regularity and repetition until perfected. When taught and applied properly, it’s a wonderful skill, fun to learn and it helps with muscle and fitness growth. Today’s lifestyle includes spending way too much time sitting, and at early age human bodies adapt to certain limited and unnatural movements. BJJ teaches children how to become aware of their body as a whole and treat it that way. After reaching this point, they will soon improve their strength, mobility, coordination and balance. In the long run, the training of martial arts will benefit their health.

There is a positive psychological aspect of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as it instills young people work ethics and social skills. They learn not to give up or become negative even when things get too frustrating, they adopt a positive general attitude, they listen to instructions, work in a team and respect their teachers, parents and other players. And also practicing any martial art is a great way of making new friends, which is very important in early stages of life.

Conclusively, one of BJJ’s greatest benefits lies in the fact that it can be put to good use, should a young person need to defend themselves. This is especially true with the increasing cases of bullying in many areas. Kids learn to defend themselves without the use of violence and the adopted methods make them feel safe and more confident in everyday life.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi

BJJ: A Ground Fighter’s Dream


If you’re a UFC fan then you have already seen a lot of BJJ (BJJ) fighting. Men like Ronaldo Jacare Souza, Roger Gracie, and Robert Drysdale have successfully used BJJ to destroy opponents. BJJ has become an epic combat sport that involves howling fans and lots of beer and wings.

It teaches the “little guy” that he can take down stronger, larger opponents by bringing the fight to the ground, and applying skillful leverage, technique, joint locks, and chokeholds.

History and Founding

BJJ evolved from Japanese roots in the early 1920s, and later spread thought the northern hemisphere like wild-fire. Many mistakenly consider Royce Gracie as the founder of modern BJJ due to his popularizing it during the early years of the UFC. Gracie proved the efficiency of BJJ by defeating competitors from many martial arts backgrounds in bloody, no holds bar battles-where he became the first UFC champion.

But the true founder was a man named Mitsuyo Maeda – known by Brazilians as Conde Coma. Maeda studied under Jigoro Kano at his Kodokan martial arts school. Maeda proved to be one of Kano’s best students. He later travelled the planet demonstrating the art form in circus and arenas. Maeda’s travels eventually brought him to Brazil; where he finally met Carlos Gracie – a troubled teen Maeda took under his wing, which helped start the Gracie BJJ lineage.

Take it to the Ground

Here is a brief overview of the trade mark maneuvers used in BJJ:

The Half Guard

The half guard is a grappling move created in the 90s by Roberto Correa. The way it works is while lying with your back to the mat, you use your legs to control one of your opponent’s legs. The move later changed the combat sport’s world-helping to reshape BJJ, Submission wrestling, and mixed martial arts.

Estima Lock

The Estima Lock is a foot lock created by the Estima brothers during the early 2000s. It became extremely popular after the No Gi World Championship of 2011-where Victor Estima used his lock to defeat all his opponents. The way it works is brutally simple, yet painfully elegant. It works by holding your opponent’s foot against your stomach and combining forward motion with your hips-twisting the poor guy’s foot in similar fashion to the dreaded toe hold.

The Berimbolo

The Berimbolo is one of the most popular moves in BJJ. The lightweight fighters of the early 2000s helped popularize this move. Though it was created in the 1990s-named the “scrambly” position. The move involves spinning upside down, disrupting your opponent’s balance-allowing you to either sweep your opponent, or take control of his or her back.

The De La Riva Guard

The De La Riva Guard was created by Ricardo De La Riva in the 1980s. It has become a staple in modern BJJ, and is taught in basic courses in schools around the world. It’s a move you use while on the ground, trying to control your opponent’s legs. The move is basic and simple, yet devastatingly effective. You wrap, or hook one of your legs around the outside of your opponent’s leg, which in turn throws him or her off-balance.

Philosophy

The above picture may paint this art form as something only for brutes. Not so fast. Like with many other martial art forms there comes a deep philosophical understanding and appreciation for peace and tolerance after years of training in a BJJ dojo. Sure, during competition, you will be ready to defeat your opponent; but in regular everyday life you will rarely, if ever, see a need to use your skills.

This applies to moments of real danger as well. Unless you are directly attacked, hence forcing a response, it’s very unlikely a veteran of BJJ will engage an untrained rough neck. The skilled practitioner of BJJ doesn’t need ego boosting. He or she gets more than enough of that on the dojo mat.

This is the concept so many people don’t understand. They assume because you have a potentially lethal skill set that you will want to show it off, or use it any chance you get. Hardly! The skilled BJJ expert will only want to use his talents to teach, compete, and keep his or her body and mind healthy.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi

Royce Gracie: My Father Served as an Example

Bareknuckle brawler? Teenaged Michael Bisping reveals he fought grown men
A feared and decorated Brazilian jiu-jitsu black belt, Leites has mixed up his game of late by adding knockouts to his repertoire of finishes. Bisping talked about his chances against the 33-year-old Brazilian. “Of course you never underestimate an …
Read more on MMAmania.com

BJ Penn says his greatest career moment didn’t come in MMA
Penn made the transition to MMA soon after in 2001, winning his first three UFC fights via violent knockouts despite his jiu-jitsu pedigree. Penn (16-10-2) would go on to earn wins over Matt Hughes (twice), Jens Pulver, Renzo Gracie, Diego Sanchez …
Read more on MMA Fighting

Royce Gracie: ‘My Father Served as an Example’
Gracie appeared so protective of his father’s name during an appearance for Bellator MMA in Bristol, Connecticut, that when he heard the words “Brazilian jiu-jitsu,” he made a point to say “Gracie jiu-jitsu.” Helio Gracie lived 95 years, fathering nine …
Read more on Breitbart News

[ad code=1 align=center]