Dipping Your Toes in the Water


The first taste of ‘the leather’. The first time you taste your own blood on the inside of your mouth. The first time your eyes water from a jab to your nose and everybody laughing, thinking you are crying. An old friend of mine summed it up pretty good. “You can never forget the first time you smell ‘the leather'”.

At first I thought he was using some sort of metaphor and meant the smell of fear. It was only later, during another sparring session that the penny dropped. The smell he spoke of was the smell of leather in your face as yet another punch found its way home.

It took some years getting used to it. Once I was,it was replaced with the feeling of panic as you suffered a choke that almost made you pass out. Strikes had been replaced by grappling and with it, the feeling of burning in your aching muscles and limbs.

I imagine, most of us, during these times ask ourselves what the hell we are doing there.

What events took place in our lives to compel us, even drive us to this moment and the similar moments that come after it on many more occasions? If, like me, you make promises to yourself that this is “the last time” only to make and break the same promises the next time then you may want to take a journey back to the start.

My own experience is probably typical. As a bullied skinny kid, I was lucky that my sister started dating a Black Belt Karate Instructor who took me under his wing. I sat in and watched the first session and, whilst admiring the participants, did not, for one minute think I could do that! “Still, might give it a go” I thought. A tiny ripple was made as I dipped my toe in the water for the first time at the next session. As a novice, sparring was out of the question, thank god. So after being taught a few basics, I made my way to the sidelines to watch the advanced grades score points off each other. There was absolutely no contact allowed with no protective equipment worn or needed. The skill and control shown was excellent. Again in my head the “not for me” mentality shone through and again it was followed by “well it can’t be that bad, must be worth a try” voice.

The next time sparring was on the agenda I was asked if I wanted to try it. Nodding, I took my turn. I don’t remember how I did but I do remember how much I enjoyed it, especially as there where no marks or bruises on me. There were none on my partner either but I suspect that was pure luck rather than any skill on my part!

I soon became a fan of sparring, preferring it over kata (personal choice not a reflection) and looked forward to more of the same.

At this time, the club I belonged to travelled out of our area to train in a joint session to be hosted by our Sensei who taught basic Shotokan and a club from Liverpool who would host the second part of the evening, teaching us an unknown system (certainly to me)”Freestyle”. They, if my memory serves me correctly, wore red suits and a type of boxing glove. We had, never seen suits of this color, we all wore the Traditional white gis. The guys from Liverpool whilst respectful, literally wiped the floor with most of the Karateka from our gym. They certainly did with me as sweep, after sweep saw my gi bottoms strike a close resemblance to the gym floor.

It was only a few years later when I became more familiar with the “names” in Martial Arts that I realised we had just been introduced to Alfie Lewis and his boys and their maverick, effective and highly skilful way of sparring. Again, I decided that their style was not for me. Far too heavy handed even at semi contact, yet a niggling desire to know more about this way of fighting kept cropping up in my mind.

For one reason or another, after some years of training and earning my purple belt, I parted company with Karate. It would be a few years before my interest was rekindled and when it was, the new club I joined wore white, elasticised cotton mitts with marginal contact allowed. The seminar with Alfie Lewis temporarily forgotten, along with the bruised calfs and bashed ego, I watched with fresh fascination as the guys at the new club, fuelled by the confidence of wearing mitts, gave and took a few heavy digs.

“Mmm, not sure about this” I thought to myself as my toes itched and wiggled to dip themselves into the water again. So, I bit the bullet, padded up and proceeded to take a few hits. Still with control but now with a touch more aggression techniques were thrown in my direction and I threw some back. A couple of bruised ribs, bit of a lump to the side of the head, nothing major and I was comfortable again. I was happy where I was until I came across some semi-contact guys who re-sparked in me what the Liverpool guys had first bought to my attention.

We were at a multi-style tournament in the North West and, as usual at these tournaments, some of us were on time, some weren’t. People, mostly in Traditional Gis and pads, warmed up and waited for their turn to fight when our attentions were turned to a group who had just arrived. There seemed to be a change in the atmosphere as we watched them warm up. I had never seen Karateka use skipping ropes and focus pads to prepare themselves before and it is fair to say that the majority of the other people there were intimidated by it all. Even more so I think, when the semi-contact guys “padded up” in their shiny dipped foam equipment.

A clean sweep across the scoring boards in the favour of the nonchalant semi-contact guys grabbed my interest. Non contact Karate was a good stepping stone and the now padded light contact was, for me, as far as I would go. Except my bloody toes thought different as they itched to “dip” again. I visited a local semi contact club affiliated to Howard Brown’s ECKA/WCKA and watched as they sparred heavier than I was used to. Common sense gave way to the itch that can’t be scratched. I remember thinking to myself “well it’s not full contact, its not going to hurt so I’ll give it a go”.

To anyone watching semi-contact and thinking the same as I thought, you, as I was, are both right and wrong. It wasn’t full contact but it did hurt. Nothing major and all in good sport, but a few cut lips and sore limbs, perhaps the odd ringing in the ears from a few hooks caught from not paying attention. These were par for the course and this was how I proceeded for a while.

Until Stallone appeared. Damn those “Rocky” films and the real hitting taking place as Balboa mania swept through all the fighting arts. Suddenly everybody wanted to know what it felt like to get hit by a big lump of meat. I myself developed an interest in Full Contact Karate which we know went on to be relabelled as Kick-Boxing. I started watching regular Sunday night bouts at a local nightclub and as the sport grew in popularity, was fascinated to see Wales’ Russ Williams defend his World crown against a strong opponent from the USA. A guy I knew also thought on the same bill and in a chat later on he laughed at my questions and explained “it’s good fun but doesn’t half hurt!”

A good friend of mine was making his name in the ABA’s and invited me to the local boxing club. I had not done any full contact conditioning and was put onto the bags straight away, snatching the odd peek at the sparring taking place behind me.

After a few sessions I had deja-vu from my Shotokan days when the coach called me to the sparring area and asked “do you want to glove up and have a go?”.

Adrenalin in overdrive, with a dry mouth and my brain screaming “no way”! I listened instead to my toe as they demanded a “dip”.

“C’mon” they seemed to say “It can’t get any worse than full contact can it”.

Right, easy for them to say, hiding comfortably in the safety of my Nikes.

My first spar was with my friend who was much more experienced in the full contact game and worked at my pace. I appreciated the respect and we became regular sparring partners. After several months we hired a room to have extra sessions ourselves and introduced kicking into the rounds. He was slightly heavier than me but with my experience in kicking, we came out even.

I had been watching a Heavyweight train at the gym and tried to imagine what it would like to take a punch from him. When he was sparring I would develop an interest in more bagwork. I was not getting hit by one of those!

Spoke to soon. One Friday night I arranged to meet my friend at the gym but upon arriving, learnt he had decided partying was better than getting hit. So now the gym was occupied by just the three of us. Myself, the coach and, that’s right…the heavyweight. Even my toes gulped as the coach suggested a few rounds.

In for a penny and all that… Whoever thought of that saying must have been stupid or never trained in full contact. Or perhaps he was stupid but had trained in full contact, hence coming up with stupid sayings.

Several rounds over and the following day I was back for more. Days became months, months became years, sparring partners, opponents and partners in crime became friends.

From absolute no contact Karate through to light, semi and eventually full contact I thought there was no further I needed to go. I had dipped my toes in enough water.

Until I met up with a leading Martial Artist who asked how my ground work was. I didn’t know how it was because I had never worked on the roads.

When I told him this he looked at me like I was speaking a different language and proceeded to explain he meant grappling. I watched a video he sent me and realised there was another aspect of “fighting” I was going to have to sample. And so I trundled off to courses and training sessions and eventually became a BAWA Wrestling Coach. My nose, jaw, ribs and other bones in my body were happy they weren’t being punched or kicked anymore. However, my muscles ached, my limbs cried out for a rest and the burns on my knees and elbows needed much love and affection to heal. At least some parts of my body had a respite.

That was until my toes thought it a good idea for another “dip” when I came across sessions that “put it all together”. “Animal Day, No Holds Barred, Strike & Grapple” call it what you will. The whole non-contact training to the “what the hell was that!” experience was and is an education, a humbling experience and well I suppose to be honest…. fun!

So good luck if you are embarking on this path, I wish you well. I will never forget my first taste of ‘the leather’ nor the first smell of ‘the leather’. I am getting to the stage were I think it’s time to put my toes in their slippers, keep them there and stop them dipping my feet in the water again… Not a chance!

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Simon Morrell

How to Add a BJJ Program to Your Martial Arts Studio


While adding a program at your martial arts studio is always in the back of your mind, it is not something that you take lightly. A lot of time and money goes into marketing, recruiting, training and observing instructor(s), adjusting your schedules, and testing students’ response, among other issues. That being said, it is hard to deny that BJJ (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) is “all the rage” right now. Wouldn’t it be worth your while to investigating an add-on Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program?

There are several BJJ Associations around the United States today, and many of them would love to help you test the waters and determine whether there is sufficient interest in your studio (and the surrounding community) to start an add-on BJJ program at your studio. A great way to do this is to put on a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu seminar at your site, and decide after seeing your students’ response. The BJJ Association you are considering joining should help you to plan and promote such a seminar, and should allow you to reserve your decision about joining until after you see the response you get. And when conducted properly, this seminar should not cost you any money; in fact, it should actually be a money maker for you. When this seminar is promoted and conducted properly, you will get a very good idea of the interest level among your students and prospects for your new Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program.

Once you decide to move forward, your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Association should work with you to provide direction and support for you and your instructor(s), for as long as you remain a member, and should provide you with a plan to train and certify your instructors to meet the Association guidelines. In some cases, your Association can even supply a qualified Brazilian Jiu Jitsu instructor to teach for you. The next step is to decide how Brazilian Jiu Jitsu best fits into your studio schedule. Obviously, the speed at which your students achieve belt promotions is determined by how many classes you offer (and the students attend) per week, which must be balanced against (a) how many Brazilian Jiu Jitsu classes you are capable of supporting, and (b) how many Brazilian Jiu Jitsu classes you want to make available each week. Do you want to offer a kid’s program as well as an adult program? If you want to teach kids, be sure your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Association can satisfy all of your concerns about teaching Brazilian Jiu Jitsu to kids. Whatever your situation, your partner BJJ Association should work with you to provide a customized plan that meets your needs and satisfies all of your concerns.

Depending on your geographic location and the nearby competition, you can determine the price to charge students for an add-on Jiu-Jitsu program. Add-on programs are typically priced between $25 and $50 per month for 1 class per week, and $125 to $175 per month for a “full blown” Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program offering 4 or more classes per week. To maintain momentum once your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program gets started, it is important to hold regular belt promotion ceremonies (i.e. on a quarterly basis) and one or more Brazilian Jiu Jitsu seminars at your studio each year. The seminars should be led by Brazilian Jiu Jitsu champions with strong teaching skills, and your Association should be able to provide (or help you to procure) the right leaders for this. Most importantly, you should also look for an Association that shares your values and has a teaching philosophy that is compatible with yours.

In summary, the best way to add on a BJJ program at your studio is to work with a BJJ Association that you are comfortable with, and that will insure consistency of your program over time. This will be accomplished with adequate and ongoing training, direction and support for you and your instructor(s), along with a customized curriculum that works for you. By working closely together, you and your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Association should be able to develop a win-win situation – where the result is a successful and sustainable add-on Brazilian Jiu Jitsu program at your studio.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Robert Tepper

Consider Martial Arts to Help Your Children in Many Ways


Children either enjoy being active and are naturally athletic or they enjoy doing other things. For those children that are involved in sports and have a sense of being on team and the immense values that can be learned from that, they are a step ahead of the class. Little ones and teenagers that are in these activities are less stressed out, they must maintain good grades to be apart of these teams and they stay fit which is fantastic for their bodies that are still developing.

If your child is lacking in the team sports department, one you may want to allow your child discover is the many forms of martial arts. Martial arts is not only great exercise, but it instills discipline and motivates children at the same time. There are many forms of martial arts that are not just the standard stand up Tae Kwon Do that you may be thinking of. There are some forms of martial arts that are geared just for floor skills such as grappling classes and the wonderful art of jui jitsu. They may not be your average football game that you may have envisioned taking your child to on the weekends, but you would be very pleased with what learning martial arts can bring to your child’s life.

It is something that needs to be addressed when you consider how children are bullied in school classrooms, hallways and school buses these days. While the epidemic is growing, it must be addressed at home with your child before they become a victim of it. Learning martial arts is not only a way to become familiar with protecting yourself which is vital for any child from other children or from a potential child abuser, but it also gives them a form of self confidence that is hard to beat with any other sport. When a child is confronted with full contact situations that they are taught fluently in martial arts classes, they have doubled their chances of not being injured in a schoolyard scuffle. They can also excel in other sports by learning martial arts as it teaches you excellent coordination.

Children must learn respect and discipline when enrolled in martial arts classes. They must respect their instructor, they must always wear their Gi, and they must excel at the expected level to gain their belt rankings in the particular field they are learning. Competitive martial arts can be applied if the parent feels comfortable with their child engaging in it. It may not be for every child, but it too is a great way to encourage your child to feel better about themselves. It can show them how far their progression has developed over the weeks or months they have attended classes and it can also be something they may want to pursue as an adult. Check into your local karate dojo or marital arts studio and find the best program for your child and always encourage them in their efforts to be a fit individual.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Jesus Smith

BJJ Technique – The Turtle Mount


The turtle mount is also know as rear mount or the back mount – Top. In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu techniques the turtle mount involves one to be behind the opponent, with one’s legs hooked around them(the opponent). In this turtle mount position, one has a major advantage over the opponent. It is an excellent position by which one can apply chokes since the opponent is unable to see what you’re doing. The back mount is used when the opponent is on all-fours position. It is advised to be sure and confident, and hook your feet around the opponent so that the opponent can’t throw you off. This is yet another transition of the turtle mount from behind. In this position the back mount can also be used when one is on their own back. This position arises when the opponent tries to roll you off from the first back mount position. For the turtle mount one should always remember to hook the feet on to the opponents hips and never cross the feet, else this will end up in a nasty foot lock.

Modern day competitions have proved that the ‘turtle mount’ is a very powerful way to control an opponent. However the medieval samurai and submission grappler’s had different concerns while grappling on the ground. The major advantage of this position is that an opponent becomes helpless to a number of submissions and has very little options or positions to escape and counter-attack. The turtle mount is not favored much in classical Ju-jutsu, because disengaging from an opponent and moving to another position quickly, is quite difficult.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Gina Dean

Estero Martial Arts World Championship


September 11th, a day known for being the anniversary of the collapse of the twin towers, is a day that inspires patriotism and pride in all proud Americans. Seems perfect that today was the day a tournament is held. When I showed up with my camera, notebook, and trusty pen, I was more than ready to snap photos and interview the best athletes I could find, I immediately was blown away by the turn out. There were people young, old, local, non-locals, and even people that flew down to this World Championship event from states as far away as Tennessee, Missouri, and Canada.

As the event began, a usual standing national anthem occurred soon followed by the Estero Martial Arts head instructor breaking a bat in half, beginning the competition. I was blown away by this example of raw power, and I was simply amazed that the human body could even do that. And the scary part is, I heard he was holding back, and that he usually breaks two bats at the same time. Taking a few steps back, and hiding behind the bleachers so I couldn’t be called upon to be the new object for “breaking” I began studying the starting competition. I’ve never been to a Martial Arts tournament before. The closest thing I’ve ever been exposed to, is sitting in front of my TV watching the old Karate Kid movies with popcorn, a coke, and my “Cobra Kai” t-shirt. Those of you who loved that movie as much as I did will get the reference. Although I do have surround sound so I felt like I was in the movie itself. So naturally, I had extremely high expectations. I was casually gazing, looking for Mr. Miyagi to come in at any time and show these people what’s up. Sadly, he didn’t how up. However, I was taking notes when I recognized Johnny from the Karate Kid coming in. At least, he bared resemblance to Johnny as he had bleached hair, a pale complexion, a Karate uniform called a gi on, and a Karate build. After a brief interview I found out his name was Lucas Abbott, age 16. He stated in the interview that he was a second generation black belt, and was currently wearing his fathers black belt to the tournament to represent his family.

Another person who I recognized as a look alike from the Karate Kid, was competing against Lucas in sparring, and forms. Although I did not get to interview this young man, I was told he was an XMA performer. For those who don’t know what XMA is, they are acronyms for Extreme Martial Arts. In which an athlete mixes gymnastics with martial arts to achieve a very entertaining performance. But since I don’t have his real name, let’s just stick with the Karate Kid reference and call him Daniel.

As the event began, Daniel went first. As he stepped onto what seemed to be a 20 by 20 foot mat, he faced the judges showing nothing yet, but confidence, and what appeared to be a sword tucked in his scabbard(sword case carried by Samurai). Suddenly, fast paced techno music came on and he whipped his sword out of the scabbard. As he was doing this, he performed a front flip and discarded the case and kept his sword firm in his hand. Show-casing his abilities, and skills, he flew through the air with a razor sharp sword doing front flips, lightning fast cuts, and yells that scared even a hardcore Karate Kid fanatic like myself. He was able to get a high score, and win his Extreme forms, and weapons divisions, and become the Estero Martial Arts Extreme World Champion. Next up was Lucas performing traditional forms.

He was against another Karate practitioner I didn’t get the privilege of talking to. He looked a little nervous, but confident enough in his abilities that he had an intimidating aura about him. He faced the judges and yelled the name of his form out as loud as he could. Just in case you were wondering, it was EXTREMELY loud. He went through the form taking slow but timly breaks to add emphasis in his punches and kicks. His uniform popped with every move and before I knew it, he was finished. After a few short bows on his way off of the padded mat, he was able to clench a nearly perfect score, beat his opponent, and become the Estero Martial Arts Forms World Champion.

As the day dwindled, I watched the remaining competition which included people of all shapes and sizes. Another young man who caught my attention was a regular attender of Estero Martial Arts, and who was able to win the over 18 sparring division. He was dressed for war, looked as if he were going to battle, and had an intense glare as he entered the mat.

He kicked, and punched his way to victory and achieved a first place trophy, and a sword as a prize. When the competition was done, the owner thanked everybody around for coming out to the event as he prepared to take off himself. To my joy, he promised that there would be another tournament next year. I look forward to seeing these defending champions, and interviewing more of them. Until next year where there will be more competitors, more titles, and hopefully a few more memorable moments.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by John Callum

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and NLP


NLP in its simplest terms is a form of applied psychology. It is a means to achieve personal and professional fulfillment. Professional athletes across the globe use NLP to prepare and perform at their highest levels each and every day. From golfers to Brazilian jiu jitsu fighters NLP plays an important role shaping an athlete’s frame of mind, not only during competition but also in their personal lives.

NLP stands for Neuro Linguistic Programming.

Neuro stands for the way in which our brain processes information received from our 5 senses.

Linguistic relates to not just words but symbols, gestures, and postures that we give meaning to. It is how we organize our perceptions of the outside world.

Programming comes from computer science. Just like we can upgrade, delete, and install software on a computer we can program our minds to change the way we think and ultimately the way we act.

I believe studying NLP and putting it into practice can be a valuable weapon for brazilian jiu jitsu fighters and MMA fighters.

It can help a competitor know exactly what he or she wants and how to achieve it.

Build self-confidence and self-esteem on and off the mat.

Put you in control of your fight not your opponent.

Enable you to fully believe in yourself and your technique instead of hesitating before attempting a submission or sweep.

Help control your thinking during a fight.

Strengthen your ability to see your opponents mistakes and capitalizing on them immediately.

I have just begun studying NLP and I already see changes in my jiu jitsu. I will document my experiences on and off the mat and hopefully help some of you improve your MMA or brazilian jiu jitsu.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Greg P Anthony

Andre Galvao’s Drill to Win


There are purists and then there are innovators; purists chose to stick with the original Jujutsu from Japan, whereas people elsewhere took this sport and modified it into a fiercely competitive sport, today known as the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is also a form of martial arts but has it reigns in the top class ground fighting. It was realized that fighters needed to be agile and nimble and at the same time be able to ‘grab’ their opponent and disable their movements – this gave rise to the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

It is a form of MMA – mixed martial arts but has its origin in ‘fighter families’ in Brazil who have further laid down rules and regulations for it to become a major sport. Now, when it is has become a sport, many stars have come into the fore – the topmost being the legendary Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter – Andre Galvao.

Andre Galvao

From 2001 to 2008 of the IBJJF World Jiu-Jitsu Championship he has won a record 7 Golds, 2 Silvers and 1 Bronze! What’s more – he is the undisputed champion in the Pan American Championships. He has won 7 Golds in total and has never been beaten in the tournament! Obviously he a master at grappling and flooring people (quite literally)!

Andre Galvao Drill to Win

For people who look up to him as an inspiration, he has been messiah of sorts for them. He has penned down a book with his dear friend – Kevin Howell. Perhaps it was the book that made Andre a world renowned figure rather than his enviable track record at Brazilian Jiu Jitsu championships and tournaments. Sadly enough, people did not know him (thanks to the absence of the sport in Olympics and other major tournaments), but he defied all ignorance and came out a winner of sorts with his book – Drill to Win.

Since the day of its release, the book is a major hit and was one of the bestsellers in the category of Sports Writing. The lucid language and inspirational stories in the book motivated people and youngsters to take up the sports. Interestingly, those who had nothing to do with the book would yet buy it owing to its motivational tone! Andre has a Jiu Jitsu academy; therefore when he is not fighting in tournaments, he is fighting and training at home and imparting training to many youngsters who idolize him!

Rightly as the man mentions in his book – ’12 months to better Brazilian Jiu Jitsu’ – it truly is a piece of art. If one ditto followed what he wrote in the book, undoubtedly he would better his Brazilian Jiu Jitsu skills in 12 months flat. This book is as good for the advanced fighters as is for the beginners. Further on flipping the pages, you will find a step by step guide to how-to-achieve, etc and pictorial representations of the same.

From mastering grapples to locks – you now have everything under a book about Brazilian Jiu Jitsu here. And what better than to learn it from Andre Galvao himself?

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Chang Frappang

Black Eagle Predator Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi Review


My first impressions of the Black Eagle Predator Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi were very favorable. I immediately loved the gold embroidery of the jacket and the cool contrast stitching on the pants. I am a huge fan of ‘bling’ Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gis and this gi did a great job of being flashy without putting twenty patches all over the jacket and pants.

Fit: The fit of this gi was great for me. I typically fit into A3s without any problem and this gi is no exception. The only issue is that, when I pull the skirt straight across, it fits a bit awkwardly in my upper body. I find that it fits me a bit tighter in my midsection. Guess it’s time to lose some weight!

Design: Like I said, I really like the design of the Black Eagle Predator. The jacket and pants have a very professional and clean look, while still catching the eye of everybody around you. The embroidery is exceptional and I will definitely look into getting another pair and getting my name stitched onto the back of it similar to what Oliver Geddes had on his Black Eagle Predator gi.

Jacket: The jacket on the Black Eagle Predator is a single piece design, but that is common to all gis. I have found that, after much pulling and sweat, the pearl weave jacket doesn’t stretch out like many other gis out there. Even though I never soaked it in vinegar and any type of color-lock, it still holds its deep black color.

Pants: The pants on the Black Eagle Predator are pretty cool as well. They are made of a ripstop material that keeps them very light, with sacrificing strength. I also like the gold contrast material on the six belt loops on the pants. I have a good amount of mobility, but they are a tad longer than any of my other pants.

Conclusion: The only thing I would change about this gi would be to make the lapel thicker. I felt very fast in this gi because it is so light and I typically train in a single or gold weave gi. I really liked the amount of flash that this gi had and it definitely got a lot of attention from training partners and coaches. Don’t buy this gi if you want to blend in. I will continue to cold wash and hang dry this gi so that it will always fit me as well as it has so far.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Brendan Evan Hufford

Black Eagle Predator Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi Review


My first impressions of the Black Eagle Predator Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi were very favorable. I immediately loved the gold embroidery of the jacket and the cool contrast stitching on the pants. I am a huge fan of ‘bling’ Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gis and this gi did a great job of being flashy without putting twenty patches all over the jacket and pants.

Fit: The fit of this gi was great for me. I typically fit into A3s without any problem and this gi is no exception. The only issue is that, when I pull the skirt straight across, it fits a bit awkwardly in my upper body. I find that it fits me a bit tighter in my midsection. Guess it’s time to lose some weight!

Design: Like I said, I really like the design of the Black Eagle Predator. The jacket and pants have a very professional and clean look, while still catching the eye of everybody around you. The embroidery is exceptional and I will definitely look into getting another pair and getting my name stitched onto the back of it similar to what Oliver Geddes had on his Black Eagle Predator gi.

Jacket: The jacket on the Black Eagle Predator is a single piece design, but that is common to all gis. I have found that, after much pulling and sweat, the pearl weave jacket doesn’t stretch out like many other gis out there. Even though I never soaked it in vinegar and any type of color-lock, it still holds its deep black color.

Pants: The pants on the Black Eagle Predator are pretty cool as well. They are made of a ripstop material that keeps them very light, with sacrificing strength. I also like the gold contrast material on the six belt loops on the pants. I have a good amount of mobility, but they are a tad longer than any of my other pants.

Conclusion: The only thing I would change about this gi would be to make the lapel thicker. I felt very fast in this gi because it is so light and I typically train in a single or gold weave gi. I really liked the amount of flash that this gi had and it definitely got a lot of attention from training partners and coaches. Don’t buy this gi if you want to blend in. I will continue to cold wash and hang dry this gi so that it will always fit me as well as it has so far.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi



Source by Brendan Evan Hufford

Grappling With The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Kimono


Just as with a warrior of old, martial artists of today give careful consideration to their equipment. And just as in days of old, practitioners of modern martial arts have for their perusal a vast array of vendors and manufacturers vying for their attention. Today’s Brazilian Jiu Jitsu kimono serves its owner much like a fine suit of armor served a warrior of old.

Early Japanese people, of both genders, wore two piece clothing consisting of short pants and a jacket like top. Eventually, through time and a few innovations, the modern judogi was derived from this early simple clothing. Today’s sophisticated,   Brazilian   Jiu   Jitsu   gi  is a modern adaptation of earlier martial arts uniforms.

Keiko means practice, an essential component of all martial arts.  Gi , meaning clothing, is a word which is most appropriately used with a “partner” word in Japanese. Outside of Japan the word is often found used alone in reference to uniforms used by martial artists. A  gi  generally consists of three parts; a heavy jacket known as the uwagi, lighter weight draw-string pants called shitabaki, and a cotton self-tie belt, the obi. While a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu-gi is similar in many respects to a standard martial arts keiko-gi, the nature of the sport calls for a tighter fit on the cuffs of the jacket and pants. A more streamlined fit of the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu-gi limits less manipulation of the fabric by opponents.

 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu  has seen many innovations in the traditional gi . Distinctive features of the gi include minimal use of seams, a jacket back without a seam, extra knee padding, and where possible reinforced seams. The seamless back is for comfort but also to reduce the wear and tear on the garment. Sometimes the legs may be reinforced below the knee. In addition to padded knees some manufacturers also offer reinforced under-arms. Thick rubberized collars, ostensibly touted as more hygienic then standard cloth collars, can function as a tactical feature as well. Opponents may find it difficult to find a grapple hold on the snug fitting rubber collar.

The gi is made from cotton cloth. It’s available in four distinctive grades. These are known as single weave, double weave, gold weave and platinum weave. However, these weaves are not standardized. The cotton is woven into a sturdy, pre-shrunk, rip-stop fabric. The term “gold weave” is not actually a weaver’s sett but a description used referring to the appearance and feel of the fabric.

An economic first choice for a beginning student is the single weave. A gi made from this type of fabric is light weight and easily cared for. But it isn’t as durable as the double weave. When a student is ready to make a commitment to the sport, increase his or her weekly practice sessions, enter into competitions and/or represent a club, then as a serious practitioner an investment in double weave may be in order.

Gold weave fabric represents a serious investment and hence a serious commitment to the sport. It is not so much a distinctive weave as a reference to the type of long stapled cotton fibre used in its construction. Platinum weave is its lightweight version. The higher quality cotton gives the fabric a luster and comfort not found in the other weaves. Yet its durability is comparable to that of double weave. Instructors and competitors often invest in this grade of fabric for their gis.

While Brazilian Jiu Jitsu kimonos can come in a variety of colors, competition rules allow for blue, black and white. Jacket colors must match the pants and of course the belt must be the appropriate rank color. For demonstrations in-house and practice sessions, some clubs have established their own colors which they may encourage their members to use.

Hypnotik Bearimbolo Gi

Source by Mario Cora